Wafflebark Ferine

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Wafflebark Ferine
(Tealdeera multiodorus)
Main image of Wafflebark Ferine
Species is extant.
Information
CreatorCoolsteph Other
Week/Generation25/159
HabitatDrake Plains, Drake Chaparral
Size2.5 m Tall
Primary MobilitySessile
SupportUnknown
DietPhotosynthesis
RespirationPassive (Stomata, Lenticels)
ThermoregulationEctotherm
ReproductionSexual, Flowers, Berries
Taxonomy
Domain
Kingdom
Subkingdom
Phylum
Class
Order
Superfamily
Family
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Phoenoplastida
Phoenophyta
Rhagioanthia
Phoenopoopsida
Canistropsilales
Yuccapinacea
Yuccapinaceae
Tealdeera
Tealdeera multiodorus
Ancestor:Descendants:


Seedlings have non-woody, relatively flexible branches. When these branches are damaged, a mildly sweet, dark-brown latex smelling strongly of maple syrup is secreted from the wound. As the wafflebark ferine's bark grows thicker and expands to cover its branches, it gradually stops producing the latex. Unlike its ancestor, the disused latex channels are filled in with a solidified, resin-like sugary substance, called "solid syrup". This solid syrup is so dark brown it appears black in certain lights, and smells of vanilla.

As the solid syrup is solidified, it is difficult for sapworms to eat. Consequently, no sapworms (at time of evolution) bother to feed on adult wafflebark ferines. Minikruggs and vermees, which can eat solid foods, are discouraged by the bitter tannins stored in the solid syrup. However, there is one specialized species of minikrugg, Kruggectia chippus, that is adapted to digest the solid syrup and deal with the tannins.

The grown wafflebark ferine uses the solid syrup to store extra sugars. The wafflebark ferine draws upon this store for growth in ideal conditions, as well as regeneration if it is damaged. In the spring, it draws upon this store to grow abundant flowers filled with nectar. Once all three flowers per leaf clump are pollinated, it starts development of berries and grows another set of flowers. Wafflebark ferine flowers are very popular among several species of woolly purple xenobees. Indeed, so many xenobees may be visiting the flora at one time that they may humorously bump into each other while flying.

Each flower grows into pink raspberry-like drupelet berries. Each berry is delicately hairy and contains multiple seeds. Relative to the sweet, abundant nectar and sugary (if tannin-filled) solid syrup, the berry is a disappointment: it is insipid and only mildly sweet (by human standards). Gutsy Phlyers and Scarlet Phlyers still eat the wafflebark ferine's berries, spreading the tiny seeds in their owl pellet-like waste.

Wafflebark ferine seedlings aren't especially flame-tolerant. While the trunk does not readily catch fire, the thin leaves do. If flames reach the leaves, they can gradually burn through the latex channels and scorch the interior walls. Seedlings are frequently killed when wildfires occur in the Drake Chaparral habitat. The smoke from burning wafflebark ferines is pleasantly aromatic.