Krakow BlackQuill

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Krakow BlackQuill
(Heicilong atrasilex)
Main image of Krakow BlackQuill
Species is extinct.
15/101, gamma-ray burst
Information
CreatorClayren Other
Week/Generation11/69
HabitatKrakow Plains
Size2.8 m Long
Primary MobilityQuadruped, Erect Posture
SupportEndoskeleton (Bone)
DietOmnivore (Violetgrass berries, Tungrabs, Carnofern berries, Nidbin fruit, Thorny-Butt Nobits, young Plains Dwellers)
RespirationActive (Lungs)
ThermoregulationUnknown
ReproductionSexual, lays hard shelled eggs in nests, two sexes
Taxonomy
Domain
Kingdom
Phylum
Superclass
Clade
Class
Subclass
Order
Suborder
Family
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Carpozoa
Spondylozoa
Anisoscelida
Pentapodes
Caudapodia
Eucaudapodia
Pentagradia
Eupentapodiformes
Hystricodraconidae
Heicilong
Heicilong atrasilex
Ancestor:Descendants:

The Krakow blackquill replaced its ancestor sometime in the Biocatian Period. The blackquill of the Krakow Plains have changed in several key ways. The animal's quills have become darker, to assist them in hiding from predators and prey. The tail, no longer needed for stability in the rockies, has changed to help the blackquill balance and has increased the overall length of the blackquill. The blackquill soon dethroned the quill lurker from its niche in the Krakow plains, and a small increase in the rocky bearhog population took care of the remaining lurkers in the Krakow Rockies. The increased population evened out quickly enough, but there would be no more quill lurkers on Sagan 4.


The blackquill has begun to move away from scavenging, and more into foraging and hunting. As a side effect of its dark pigment, the blackquill hunts and forages mostly at night, and are quite inactive during the day. During the day, the small groups of ten to fourteen blackquills sleep near each other. The size of the blackquill "pack" allows one member to stand guard, in case a scavenger gulper or sticky cube-dragger tries to attack a defenseless youth, egg, or even adult of the species. Interestingly enough, the blackquills largest prey is also its distant cousin; the plains dweller.

Gallery

Living Relatives (click to show/hide)

These are randomly selected, and organized from lowest to highest shared taxon. (This may correspond to similarity more than actual relation)
  • Xatadeega (subclass Eucaudapodia)
  • Mystery Capiri (class Caudapodia)