Roaming Capoo

From Sagan 4 Alpha Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Roaming Capoo
(Fulminiridis infucatustergoris)
Artwork of Roaming Capoo
Species is extinct.
15/101, gamma-ray burst
Creator Oviraptor Other
Taxonomy
Domain
Kingdom
Phylum
Superclass
Class
Subclass
Order
Family
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Carpozoa
Spondylozoa
Anisoscelida
Caudapodia
Arcuvelia
Vexillacephalia
Fulminirididae
Fulminiridis
Fulminiridis infucatustergoris
Week/Generation 9/60
Habitat Ittiz Rocky, Ittiz-Nuke Alpine
Size 1.5 m tall
Primary Mobility Unknown
Support Endoskeleton (Bone)
Diet Herbivore (Orbiflor, Firpalm)
Respiration Active (Lungs)
Thermoregulation Mesotherm
Reproduction Sexual, lays hard shelled eggs in nests, two sexes


The roaming capoo has split from the browsing capoo, and lives a migratory life. During the winter, it will spend its time in the the Ittiz Rocky region and eat the orbiflor that live there. In summer, they head to the mountains of the Ittiz-Nuke Alpine region, where they eat the firpalm. This is also where they lay their eggs. Because these two regions are completely devoid of predators, the roaming capoo no longer needs to use its color-changing ability to camouflage itself. Instead, they use it to communicate with each other, and will shine vibrantly when trying to attract mates. The have developed a large bony crest on top of their heads which also comes into play in mating season. The two tiny limbs have now vanished, as they are no longer needed. They walk and run mainly on their front two limbs, only using their rear tail-limb for stability, especially when in the mountains. The area around their knee-claw is thick and padded because they often have to walk on them in the mountains, especially while tending eggs. They live in medium sized herds.

Gallery

Living Relatives (click to show/hide)

These are randomly selected, and organized from lowest to highest shared taxon. (This may correspond to similarity more than actual relation)
  • Mystery Capiri (subclass Arcuvelia)
  • Quilled Pinyuk (class Caudapodia)