Beach Slider

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Beach Slider
(Limacosepia halbios)
Artwork of Beach Slider
Species is extinct.
15/101, gamma-ray burst
Creator Giant Blue Anteater Other
Taxonomy
Domain
Kingdom
Phylum
Class
Subclass
Superorder
Order
Family
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Carpozoa
Teuthomorpha
Cystoteuthia
Pankrakenia
Herpetoteuthiformes
Herpetoteuthii
Limacosepiidae
Limacosepia
Limacosepia halbios
Week/Generation 8/54
Habitat Wright-Jujubee Beach
Size 30 cm Tall
Primary Mobility Unknown
Support Unknown
Diet Omnivore (Stickyballs, meat)
Respiration Active (Lungs)
Thermoregulation Unknown
Reproduction Sexual, Two Sexes (Donor and Carrier), Ovoviviparous


The beach slider is an amphibious animal that split from the sea floater. Unlike the sea floater, which visits the beach occasionally for food, the beach slider is truly adapted for life on the beach. The four ambulatory tentacles lay flat on the ground. The tentacular "feet" move the beach slider forward. The eyes have become more of a "pinhole", which can let it detect limited images. The manipulative tentacles have become chemoreceptive, which allows the Beach Slider to smell. Its diet consists of stickyballs, smaller animals, carrion, and anything the sea spits out. The poison glands moved into the mouth. When killing prey, the toxin is injected into it. The hydrogen sac is now simply a vocal organ, with air passing through the hole on the forehead. Vocal cords developed to vibrate the sound, which is then amplified from the sac. They have became social and communicate by changing colors. Beach sliders have become more intelligent, which helps them find food and care for their young.

The hermaphroditic sex of the beach slider develops a phallus-like organ, called the phallodeum, that places the eggs or sperm in the carrier sex's pouch. The pouch holds the eggs. The young hatch inside the pouch, but are kept inside until they can survive outside. The baby beach sliders are weak and need much attention, being only a few inches long. The parents defend the babies aggressively if something tries to eat them, such as a leatherback scuttlecrab.

Living Relatives (click to show/hide)

These are randomly selected, and organized from lowest to highest shared taxon. (This may correspond to similarity more than actual relation)
  • Cave Teuthopin (family Limacosepiidae)
  • Mudslider Teuthopin (superorder Herpetoteuthiformes)