Boundweller

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Boundweller
(Macropodosaurus gigantonychus)
Main image of Boundweller
Species is extinct.
19/125, ice comet impact event
Information
CreatorTheBigDeepCheatsy Other
Week/Generation17/115
HabitatFlisch-Krakow Rainforest, Krakow Scrub, Flisch Savanna
Size1.35 m Long
Primary MobilityUnknown
SupportEndoskeleton (Bone)
DietHerbivore (Feathergrass, Sugar-Trunked Balloonarch, Leafy Palmshrub, Hugograss, Joint-Winged Treeworm leaves, Scrub Flowerworm leaves )
RespirationActive (Lungs)
ThermoregulationUnknown
ReproductionSexual, Lays hard-shelled eggs in nests, Two sexes
Taxonomy
Domain
Kingdom
Phylum
Superclass
Clade
Class
Subclass
Order
Suborder
Family
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Carpozoa
Spondylozoa
Anisoscelida
Pentapodes
Caudapodia
Eucaudapodia
Pentagradia
Dendrohallotiformes
Dendrohallotidae
Macropodosaurus
Macropodosaurus gigantonychus
Ancestor:Descendants:

When the leaping tree dweller was being constantly hunted by plume-tailed azelemurs, some have adapted to living on the ground and have evolved into boundwellers, which split from its ancestor. Since it lives on the dry ground, it had to adapt to its environment. In order to protect itself from predators, it has evolved a sharper tail-spike, which is used to slash its predators. It also uses its claws and kicking feet to defend from predators. In order to look out for predators, its lower set of eyes have evolved into eye-stalks that point backwards.

An important adaptation is a pair of small canines which are used to tear plants apart and make them easier to swallow. The boundweller can lift its long neck to reach for leafy palmshrub leaves.

During mating season the males fight each other to get a mate. The winner gets its mate, they start laying 3 to 5 eggs and females will sit on the eggs while the male collects grasses for its family. Each mated pair belong to an extended family of about 10 to 12; this group will travel together and feed.

The adults are able to leap and hop for long distances, while young and elderly walk similarly to Earth's great apes. When trouble is sensed, the young climb on to the parent's backs and grab on while the parents leap out of danger's way. However, the young only do this until they are able to hop.

Their color-changing ability is limited, with only the head and stripes changing color, and even then only for interspecies communication. Normally it stays purple to blend in with the grasses they eat but will appear as a bright red if there is trouble.

Living Relatives (click to show/hide)

These are randomly selected, and organized from lowest to highest shared taxon. (This may correspond to similarity more than actual relation)
  • Disasterxata (subclass Eucaudapodia)
  • Mystery Capiri (class Caudapodia)