Sickle Hookworm

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Sickle Hookworm
(Camurvermis flacis)
Main image of Sickle Hookworm
Species is extinct.
18/118, outcompeted by Pick Gilltail
Information
CreatorBioCat Other
Week/Generation17/116
HabitatSomarinoa Coast, Yokto Coast, Huggs Coast
Size60 cm Long
Primary MobilityUnknown
SupportUnknown
DietOmnivore (Interlocking Crystal Koral, Obelisk Crystal, Prong Crystal, Ur-Corkskrew Crystal, Poison Crystal Shrub, Wave Crystal, Moss-Eating Sea Finworm, Gillfin, Koral Gilltail, Plated Swarmer, Bubbleweed Sea Finworm)
RespirationPassive (Transcutaneous)
ThermoregulationEctotherm
ReproductionSexual, two sexes, eggs laid on crystal flora
Taxonomy
Domain
Kingdom
Subkingdom
Phylum
Subphylum
Class
Subclass
Order
Superfamily
Family
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Binucleozoa
Symbiovermes (info)
Pterigiophora (info)
Eupterigiophora
Rostroichthyes
Sarcohistia
Curalivermiformes
Catasphenognathoidea
Catasphenognathidae
Camurvermis
Camurvermis flacis
Ancestor:Descendants:

The sickle hookworm split from its ancestor, the mining beakworm. When the gilltails started to compete with the mining beakworms some started to use their pickaxes as weapons to scare away their competitors or even slay them. As time passed by some of these learned to feed on the corpses of those gilltails they have killed and evolved a secondary yet critical diet of meat as well as their main diet of crystal flora. Their pickaxes changed in shape in order to be used as deadly weapons against their prey and now they often bash the crystals with their front part of the beak which might not be as sharp as the one their ancestors use but is still effective enough to do the job. They no longer feed only on the gilltails and can consume any prey that is small enough for them to catch and impale. They live alone and only meet to mate. They lay their eggs on the local crystal flora, usually rather hidden and protected not to be harmed from other crystal feeders. The young work together once they hatch and live and hunt together for the first few months of their lives. Later when they get big enough to hunt on their own, each takes its own path.

Living Relatives (click to show/hide)

These are randomly selected, and organized from lowest to highest shared taxon. (This may correspond to similarity more than actual relation)
  • Plump Gillfin (subclass Sarcohistia)
  • Thornback Waterworm (class Rostroichthyes)