Stilt-Leg Islesnapper

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Stilt-Leg Islesnapper
(Grallacarpus tiptoe)
Main image of Stilt-Leg Islesnapper
Species is extinct.
18/122, replaced by descendant
Information
CreatorTheBigDeepCheatsy Other
Week/Generation18/120
HabitatOvi Island Beach, Ovi Coast
Size85 cm Tall
Primary MobilityQuadruped, Erect Posture
SupportEndoskeleton (Hollow Bone)
DietCarnivore (Walking Uktank young, Raking Uktank, Sail Gillfin, Rusty-Red Foi, Curtain Urstar, Urstar)
RespirationActive (Lungs)
ThermoregulationEndotherm (Downy Feathers)
ReproductionSexual, Hard-Shelled Eggs, Two Sexes
Taxonomy
Domain
Kingdom
Phylum
Superclass
Clade
Class
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Carpozoa
Spondylozoa
Anisoscelida
Tetrapodes
Dakoptera (info)
Tectopteriformes
Insulasauridae
Grallacarpinae
Grallacarpus
Grallacarpus tiptoe
Ancestor:Descendants:

The stilt-leg islesnapper replaced its ancestor in the Ovi Island Beach. Due to competition between the fatlip islesnapper, it had to evolve some new techniques in survival. Its front legs have become larger and are used to lunge itself towards prey. The way it moves is unusual, it begins by placing its feet onto the ground, then it lifts up its front legs and places them onto the ground. Using its front legs, it lifts its body, swings itself, lands on its feet, and this cycle of movement continues. It even lifts its front legs up, displaying its colors to scare off any competitors. The colorations on its front legs also determine how healthy a stilt-leg islesnapper is, the brighter, the healthier. It also will go to the shallow regions of the coast to hunt for sail gillfin and urstars. The way it moves in the shallows is that it uses its front legs to wade in the water and it uses its talons to snatch anything swimming in the water. They are still warm-blooded and covered with short feathers that keep them warm.


The stilt-leg islesnapper lives in a matriarchal pack, which means the female is in control and other females have higher ranks than males within the group. These packs consist of 10 members, of which 5-6 adults hunts and the rest guard the eggs. When groups get too large, the lowest adult members of the pack are exiled and sent out to make a new pack. During mating season, the females do various dances, which include waving its front legs around, lifting itself up and down using its front legs, whipping its tail on the ground, and bobbing its head. The purposes of these dances are to scare off any weaker females and to attract males. Each member of the pack lays 2-3 eggs in the spring.

Living Relatives (click to show/hide)

These are randomly selected, and organized from lowest to highest shared taxon. (This may correspond to similarity more than actual relation)
  • Swiftsnapper (class Dakoptera)