Gillsnatch

From Sagan 4 Alpha Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Gillsnatch
(Allobranchiocetus gillus)
Main image of Gillsnatch
Species is extinct.
19/125, ice comet impact event
Information
CreatorHydromancerx Other
Week/Generation17/115
HabitatSouth Polar Coast (West), Krakow Coast
Size4 m Long
Primary MobilityUnknown
SupportUnknown
DietCarnivore (Krakow Swarmer, Gilltail, Corkscrew Uksip, Cloud Skysnapper, Teuthopin)
RespirationUnknown
ThermoregulationUnknown
ReproductionSexual, Two Sexes, Lays Eggs in Coastal Sands
Taxonomy
Domain
Kingdom
Phylum
Class
Order
Family
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Carpozoa
Spondylozoa
Teratobyssa
Harpactocetes
Allobranchiocetidae
Allobranchiocetus
Allobranchiocetus gillus
Ancestor:Descendants:

The gillsnatch replaced its ancestor, the frigidsnatch in the western south polar coast. There it got slightly smaller since there are no large prey anymore. Rather than breathing water out of its mouth, it has developed a "gill node" on the front of its chest which filters water as it swims. It has thick blubber to keep it warm and must eat often since it is warm-blooded. Its lower eyes have improved to search for prey under water while its other 2 eyes search the sky for flying prey. If prey is in the sky it will grab it in flight with its long neck. If the prey is in the water it will lunge down to grab it like a heron. It now has a 3-toothed jaw which snaps up food. Two teeth face down while the 3rd faces up.

Gillsnatches tend to mate in the spring and then lay their eggs in the summer. Females will lay their "mermaid purse" eggs in the sand on the coastal sea floor. Each egg has a fatty layer around it to keep it protected from the icy waters. Females do not care for their young and the offspring must survive on their own. Thus smaller prey are perfect for them. It is only when they get bigger that they have trouble finding enough food to eat.

Living Relatives (click to show/hide)

These are randomly selected, and organized from lowest to highest shared taxon. (This may correspond to similarity more than actual relation)
  • Shorthorn Scylarian (class Teratobyssa)