Hook-Beak River Gilltail

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Hook-Beak River Gilltail
(Naharkeres harlequin)
Main image of Hook-Beak River Gilltail
Species is extinct.
22/140, habitat loss
Information
CreatorMnidjm Other
Week/Generation18/120
HabitatHuggs River, Bone River, Huggs Lakes
Size25 cm Long
Primary MobilityUnknown
SupportUnknown
DietOmnivore (Luminbean, Typophillion, River Flashbud, River Bubbleweed, Mud Finworm, Powder Petitworm, River Bubblepede. )
RespirationSemi-Active (Ram Gill)
ThermoregulationEctotherm
ReproductionSexual, Two Sexes, Eggs into Sand
Taxonomy
Domain
Kingdom
Subkingdom
Phylum
Subphylum
Clade
Clade
Class
Order
Family
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Binucleozoa
Symbiovermes (info)
Pterigiophora (info)
Eupterigiophora
Argyroscolecia
Pancaudabranchia
Caudabranchia (info)
Branchiouriformes
Branchiouridae
Naharkeres
Naharkeres harlequin
Ancestor:Descendants:

When the mining beakworm and krystal snoutsuckling went extinct, the crystal gilltail population exploded. Now, facing overpopulation, some of the crystal gilltails adapted to life in the rivers, splitting into a new line. The hook-beak river gilltail evolved contractile vacuoles in their gill cells to push some of the excess water out, maintaining homeostasis. This adaptation means they can survive in and type of water. Their outward appearance has not changed much. They have a blueish coloring to their fins and tail and have a slightly darker coloring. The most drastic change is to their beaks.

The hook-beak river gilltails are omnivores, so they need to catch prey. They are able to take down prey as big as they are by swimming up to them and impaling them with their beaks. They also uses their beaks to break apart plants for them to eat. The males have a horn on the end of their beaks, which they use to defend their territories from rival males during mating season.

Living Relatives (click to show/hide)

These are randomly selected, and organized from lowest to highest shared taxon. (This may correspond to similarity more than actual relation)
  • Common Gilltails (family Branchiouridae)
  • Maritime Shockshell Gilltail (order Branchiouriformes)
  • Slither Longtail (class Caudabranchia)