Spitting Islepede

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Spitting Islepede
(Sputaticaris undaconicio)
Main image of Spitting Islepede
Species is extinct.
19/125, sinking of Yokto Island
Information
CreatorClayren Other
Week/Generation17/115
HabitatYokto Island
Size95 cm Long
Primary MobilityUnknown
SupportUnknown
DietHerbivore (Rubric Sticky-Cube, Sticky-Structure)
RespirationUnknown
ThermoregulationEctotherm
ReproductionSexual, 4 Sexes, Frog-Like Eggs into the Water
Taxonomy
Domain
Kingdom
Subkingdom
Phylum
Class
Order
Suborder
Family
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Phoenoplastida
Pansegmentocaudazoa
Segmentocaudazoa
Anipeda
Nariremuliformes
Yoktocarida
Sputaticaridae
Sputaticaris
Sputaticaris undaconicio
Ancestor:Descendants:

The spitting islepede split from its ancestor to prey primarily on the larger rubric sticky-cube and sticky-structure. The islepedes saliva originally helped it to digest the odd rubric without causing damage to itself. The ability of the creatures saliva to neutralize the sticky cubes acidic body evolved into a new way of hunting. Spitting islepedes; working in small groups of four to eight, can hurl their saliva at the medium members of the rubric and structure species to make them less dangerous. Once the digestive acid of the cube is neutralized they will move in and eat as many balls as possible. The islepedes only attack cube forms, as individuals are too small to be worth the effort and the massive colonies are too dangerous and thick for the neutralizing spit to work. The larger prey has paid off for the spitter species, and it has grown to be ninety-five centimeters long. It has also grown more hairs on its grasper antennae to help it locate its prey.

The spitting islepede has also developed a better way to mate. The A sexes (male A and female A can only produce male A and male B) live together in groups of four to five in the northern part of Yokto island and the B sexes (male B and female B only produce female A and female B) live in the southern part of Yokto in similar groups. Once a year the B sexes travel to the northern tip (which is more moist) to lay their eggs. While it does make it a bit harder for females of the species because they must travel down south a few months after birth, it ensures that future generations will have the ability to survive in both the temperate forest like area and the savanna like area of Yokto Island. There's also a bit of a trade off involved with the regionalism of the two groups. While the A sexes have easier access to water, they have a smaller hunting area compared to the B sexes.

Living Relatives (click to show/hide)

These are randomly selected, and organized from lowest to highest shared taxon. (This may correspond to similarity more than actual relation)
  • Barnapede (order Nariremuliformes)
  • Lamarpede (class Anipeda)