Dwarf Bandersnatch

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Dwarf Bandersnatch
(Chloropleurus musculus)
Main image of Dwarf Bandersnatch
Species is extinct.
22/?, unknown cause
Information
CreatorNergali Other
Week/Generation20/133
HabitatJlindy Tropical Beach, Dixon Scrub , Dixon Savanna , Dixon High Grasslands, Dixon Plains
Size10 cm Long
Primary MobilityUnknown
SupportEndoskeleton (Jointed Wood)
DietHerbivore (Bitter Beachballs, Brinebane, Rapidbane, Painballs), Photosynthesis
RespirationActive (Lungs)
ThermoregulationMesotherm
ReproductionSexual, Two Sexes, Live Birth
Taxonomy
Domain
Superkingdom
Kingdom
Subkingdom
Phylum
Class
Order
Suborder
Superfamily
Family
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Viridisagania
Mancerxa
Phytozoa (info)
Chloropodia (info)
Pterophylla (info)
Leptorhyncha
Sphairavorineae
Carrolisauroidea
Carrolisauridae
Chloropleurus
Chloropleurus musculus
Ancestor:Descendants:

Having split from its ancestor, the dwarf bandersnatch has greatly shrunken in size. Their numbers have greatly increased, though this species of bandersnatch does not form groups of any kind and is a solitary species. Its "wings" have fused into the sides of its body, and act as solar panels for absorbing the rays of the sun and performing photosynthesis. Their internal metabolism is so efficient that they need never drink water and in fact gain all the liquids they need from their food.

In order to get around the defenses of some flora, the dwarf bandersnatch has developed several strategies. For the painballs they peel away the outside skin and only eat the insides, their hard jaws well protected from the flora's microscopic "spears". For the brinebane, the dwarf bandersnatch only feeds on the leaves, avoiding the brine-filled stem.

After mating, a male and female dwarf bandersnatch will dig a burrow, after which several young are born within it. The young, known as snipes, are raised by both parents for nearly 3 months before they are capable of surviving on their own. Adults will take turns bringing food back to the nest, and will guard it fiercely from both predators and invaders. This process is necessary as young snipes are completely helpless for their first week and a half of life and rely on the mother who has evolved a pair of glands on both of her sides from which a milk-like liquid is secreted. This liquid is highly nourishing and promotes rapid growth in the young.

Living Relatives (click to show/hide)

These are randomly selected, and organized from lowest to highest shared taxon. (This may correspond to similarity more than actual relation)
  • Mandate Bandersnatch (family Carrolisauridae)
  • Coastrunner Bandersnatch (superfamily Carrolisauroidea)
  • Emulswimmer (suborder Sphairavorineae)
  • River Hikahoe (class Pterophylla)